Friday, October 24, 2014


THERE ARE NOW 2 REVIEWS OUT FOR MY NEW HISTORICAL NOVEL:
1.REVIEW By Jamie Polychrones JAMES M. BECHER has an uncanny way of mixing history with fiction in The Christmas Victory. He takes famous individuals from the past and expands on some the actual events that occurred in their lives with fictional suppositions. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Mark Twain are major contributors to American literature. But their personal lives remain hidden in the past. This historical fiction novel expertly weaves two genres together to create a tale that’s entirely possible. No one will ever know the true beliefs of these two men, but readers will enjoy James’ speculation about their everyday lives. With a spiritual slant, this book will enlighten and inspire readers and fellow writers to examine their own lives and contribution to history. Tragedy defines their future in this novel, as it does for many people. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------> 2.Machelle Miller's review (Goodreads) First of all, let me say that this is a must read!! The story line is mixed with just the right amount of historical information, which makes the book both a learning tool as well as a heart-warming experience. The sermon itself is one that I will always remember, and leaves no doubt that it can change lives. I loved the poem that eventually became the Christmas Carol "I Heard the Bells On Christmas Day." When I heard vs. 4 it brought tears to my eyes, because for the first time I realize what the original context might have been. Thank you to James Becher for my signed advance copy, and the privilege of writing this review. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can purchase the print version directly from the publisher HERE OR from Amazon HERE OR you can get the eBook directly from the publisher HERE

Monday, July 21, 2014

MY NEW NOVEL IS NOW READY


My new novel is now published and posted to websites. Here is the cover:
and here is the first chapter: (It's bunched up because of the settings of this blog, but you can get the idea: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------> CHAPTER 1: THE FIRE As the song says, it’s the most wonderful time of the year. Yet, it can also be the most terrible time of the year. There's just something about the Christmas season which magnifies both joys and sorrows. The previous December had been one of true uninterrupted delight, despite the news of South Carolina's secession from the union. Upon reading that somewhat disturbing piece of news in the newspaper, Henry had smiled a sort-of half way smile and said “They'll learn. They'll soon come back, begging to be let back in.” He had just sent his patriotic poem “Paul Revere's Ride" into the Atlantic Monthly and had been hoping that its publication might serve to remind the nation of its start and in doing so, help to bring about unity. Soon the news of South Carolina's secession had been forgotten and Christmas cheer was in full swing. In addition to the tree trimming, the cookie baking and the present wrapping, there were those horse drawn sleigh rides through the countryside to view the lighted houses and the Christmas trees which might be seen through open windows. He had driven the horse with his wife and five children behind in the huge sleigh, all bundled up in their heavy coats and scarfs and woolen caps, talking, laughing and singing the beautiful carols of Christmas, led by his wife, Fanny. There was little Edith, 7 years old, Alice Mary who was 10, Francis, who was 13, Ernest, who had just turned 15, and Charles, the eldest, now 16. They had glided along under starry skies, between snow laden pines and though blankets of snow to the sound of sleigh bells and the occasional ringing of church bells. As they passed by the ice bound Charles River, they could see the multicolored lights from many gelatin cup lamps reflected in the ice, and even from those houses yet unlit for Christmas shone the yellow light of the kerosene lamps whose reflection seemed like so many Christmas candles. Whenever they came upon an especially beautifully lighted house or saw a beautifully decorated tree, either in a yard or through an unshaded window, they would yell out: “Wow, look at that one!” He recalled one of those rides in particular when they rode by one particular house which had a large set of crudely carved and painted nativity figures on the lawn, clearly visible from the glow of the nearby brilliant gas lighted street lamps. Seeing the figures reflected in the ice of the river, little Edith had asked, “What are these people and why are they looking up at us from the ice?” Fanny, the mother, had smiled and said, “They are looking up because you are looking at the reflection in the ice. Who they are is that they are the Holy family of the nativity.” “But who are they and what's a 'tivity?” “They are Mary, Joseph and the Baby Jesus.” Fanny had replied. “The nativity is a term we use to refer to His birth, because He was born to bring peace to the earth.” “Oh, I see—kinda like Saint Nicholas.” “Kinda.” And that was all that had been said. Then, as they drove under a clump of trees, the bare branches above them would release a shower of sparkling snow and the children would giggle with delight as the snow would hit them in various parts of their bodies. It soon became a game to see who would get hit where next. “I bet the next one hits you right on the head.” “No, it's gonna hit you in the nose.” “Whoops! You were both wrong. It hit Edith on the chest.” But this year was to be different. There would be no sleigh rides this year—No carol singing and no giggles. This December, 1861, as he sat in his study staring blankly out the window at the beautifully lighted tree his children had decorated, Henry was filled with a strange sense of ambivalence. He missed his dear wife, Fanny so much that it hurt. She loved Christmas so. She would always be the one to get the ball rolling, so to speak—to encourage the children to trim the tree, to go shopping with them and help them wrap their presents, to bake the cookies—he could almost smell the aroma of her cookies baking now. It had been five months since the fatal fire, but he could see it in his mind’s eye as though it were yesterday. In fact, Henry could see that whole disastrous summer in his mind’s eye. It had been a time of great disappointment indeed. The first real disappointment had been the war. Even though a total of seven states had seceded from the union, he had still harbored hopes that the peace conference would bring about their re-instatement. What it had brought about, however was only a strengthening of the southern position, with the passage of the crown act which had forbidden congress to interfere with slavery. Upon reading that piece of news in the paper, Henry had sighed and said “Well, then, I suppose slave owners can treat their slaves any way they like.” “Do you think most of the owners beat their slaves, Father?” Charles had asked. Henry had simply sighed and said, “I don’t know, Son. I don’t know, and I don’t know how we can know for sure.” Yet, the new president, Abraham Lincoln, had seemed to be just the man to re-unite the country. Henry recalled that he had been filled with hope as he had read Lincoln's inaugural address in the newspaper. It had seemed so full of promise. “Thank God,” Henry had said, after reading the address. “It looks like we’ve finally got a president who can get something done.” Yet, he also recalled that lovely spring day when he had been speaking with his oldest son, Charles, now 17, about the possibility of civil war. “I know that Lincoln has promised not to attack first,” Charles was saying, but, with the way the south is now, don't you think civil war is a distinct possibility?” “No Son, I don't.” he had replied. “If anyone can unite this country, President Lincoln can.” But just then, they had heard the news boy outside, ringing his bell and yelling out the news of war. “Rebels attack Fort Sumter. War is declared! Read all about it!” He had sent Charles out to buy the paper and had slumped back in his chair, greatly disappointed. He had thought that surely Lincoln would be able to keep the country united and avoid war. He had slumped further down in his armchair and dozed off to sleep. ****** It was two and a half months later, and he had again been talking with Charles, when the news came of Union defeat. He had been telling Charles “It looks like we have a good chance of winning the war.” “Yes, Father.” Charles had replied. “Perhaps this stupid war will be over soon.” “Let's hope so, Son.” But just then, they had heard again the newsboy's bell and the boy yelling out the headlines: “Union forces routed at Carthage. General Sigel withdraws. Read all about it.” “Oh no!” he had sighed. “It looks like it's going the other way.” Again he had gone into his study and had slumped down in his easy chair. Again he had begun to doze off. It had been unseasonably hot that July, and Fanny had decided to trim the heavy locks of their seven year old daughter, Edith's hair. Dozing off, he had been able to faintly hear them speaking in the adjacent room. “But, mother, I don't feel hot, really.” “Believe me, Edith, you'll feel a lot better without all that hair. Let me just trim off a few of these locks.” “Well, alight mother, but could you be quick about it? I want to go out and play.” At this point, he was in dreamland. He hadn’t heard Fanny say, “There, that's perfect, and these locks are so perfect that I think I'll save one for posterity,” or Edith ask: “O.K. Mother, can I go out and play now?” He hadn’t heard Fanny remark as she heated the wax to seal the envelope, “Yes, dear, but change into your play clothes first.” “Must I mother?” the child had replied, still unheard by the slumbering Henry. Fanny had been about to answer, when, perhaps because of the distraction of Edith's question, some of the hot drops of wax had fallen unseen onto her dress. Then, as if on signal from an unseen evil force, a boisterous breeze had blown through the open window and set the smoldering dress aflame. “Oh, mother, mother! Your dress is on fire!” had yelled Alice Mary, who’d been standing in the doorway, watching the whole procedure. In an effort to protect her young daughters from the flames, Fanny had rushed, screaming into her husband's study. He had awakened with a start, yelling, “What in the world? O my God, Fanny!” He had first tried to extinguish the flames with a rug, and when that had failed he had begun to throw his body onto his wife, severely burning his face, arms and hands, yelling all the while. By now all the children had gathered and begun yelling hysterically as well. Then Charles had yelled out, “Silence! We will get nowhere by panicking. You other children lead them to their bedroom, while I go for Doc. Buridge.” Soon Charles was back with the doctor. Henry had lain there in pain, as the doctor applied the ointment to him and to his wife beside him. When he had awakened the next morning, she was still beside him. She had asked for a cup of coffee. Charles had brought it to her. She had drunk it and lain back in the bed. An hour later she was gone. Henry had called her name, but she had not answered. He had gotten up and tired shaking her, but there had been no response. He had gazed in disbelief and shock at her lifeless body. He had asked God a thousand times since that fateful day, why. Why had she been taken from him when he felt he needed her so? Or why had he not died along with her? But, he realized that this was just selfish thinking. If he were gone too, who would take care of the children? He had tried to forget about her and the terrible fire, first by turning to laudanum and ether, which he obtained from the nearby apothecary. They had also helped to ease the pain from the burns, but he’d soon found himself becoming too dependent on these substances and had realized that they could also leave him helpless at times to tend to the children when they most needed him. So he had decided to stop the drugs and to start a new writing project instead. He had come up with what he thought was a good idea for a new book--a group of poems centered around a wayside inn. The burns had begun to heal and be less painful, and his concentrated effort on his new writing project had helped him forget about the fire and his loss for a while. But, then the awful memories would come flooding back. This Christmas season, 1861, the house seemed especially empty even with the cheery voices of the children. They had somehow gotten over their mother's death. Children are somehow more pliable than adults—they bounce back easier. He felt he would never get over it. And now that it was Christmas time again, he thought it may never really be Christmas again without her. He was in his study, staring at a blank page as the children played noisily outside. Edith, the youngest girl, said to the other children “It's almost Christmas. I wonder if we're going to go on the sleigh rides again this year.” Charles, the eldest, replied: “I doubt it seriously. Father is still grieving Mother, so we have to be patient and don't bother him about rides or anything until he's ready.” But would he ever be ready, they wondered. “Well what about the Christmas tree?” asked Edith. “We’d better not bother him with that either,” replied Charles, “and I don’t think I’m up to chopping one down and bringing it in, either. It would be quite a task, even with all of you helping. So why don’t we just decorate that big fir tree that’s there outside the window? We can look at it through the window, and it will almost be the same thing.” “Well,” sighed Edith, “It won’t be exactly the same, but I guess it’ll do.” Henry was trying to concentrate on his new book, when noticed the children taking the box of decorations and gelatin cup lamps outside. He wondered what they were up to, so he asked: “Children, where are you going with those things?” “We’re taking them outside to decorate the tree outside the window.” replied Charles. “Yes,” added Mary Alice, “we didn’t want to bother you about cutting down a tree for the inside.” Henry smiled. “Well, that’s quite thoughtful of you children.” Then, as they continued out the door, his thoughts went back to his book, and then back again to Fanny. He managed to buy a few gifts for the children and, they made some token gifts for him and they exchanged them in the living room, on Christmas morning, while viewing the live decorated tree through the window. But, somehow, for them it just wasn’t the same, and for him, his heart just was not in it. They tried to cheer him up, but he would have none of it. “Come on, Father, it's Christmas. It's the time to be merry.” “You be merry!” he replied. “My dear children, I doubt if I shall ever be merry again.” “We miss her too, Father!” said Edith, almost in tears herself. “Yes, we do,” added Charles. “She was our Mother! But life goes on!” “Does it?” he asked cynically. “My life has ended. I'm just existing.” Nothing they could say or do could snap him out of his deep depression. So they gave up and left him to his misery. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can purchase the print version directly from the publisher HERE OR from Amazon HERE OR you can get the eBook directly from the publisher HERE

Tuesday, June 10, 2014


NEWS:

NOW the print version of this exciting Biblical novel is split in two, instead of all 3 parts being together in one volume. ------------------------------------------------------------------- The two separate volumes are as follows:------------------------------------------------------- (1)"Of Such Is The Kingdom, Parts I&II, A Novel of the Christ and the Roman Empire, available here, ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
And(2) "Of Such Is The Kingdom, Part III, Power and Persecution, A Novel of The Early Church and the Roman Empire,
, available here.

Monday, October 01, 2012

The newly revised and expanded 2nd edition of my biblical novel, "Of Such Is The Kingdom" is now available as an e-book on Amazon Kindle as well as on smashwords.com. For ordering info. see notes in the posts below.

Thursday, July 19, 2012

GREAT NEWS: The newly revised and expanded 3 part version of my Biblical novel "OF SUCH IS THE KINGDOM" is now out in print. (See related posts for ordering info.)

YOU SHOULD GIVE THIS NOVEL THIS CHRISTMAS. TO SEE WHY, GO HERE.

Monday, November 05, 2007

TO SEE WHY I SAY MY NOVELS ARE UNIUQE, CLICK HERE or read the synopsis and figure it out for yourself.
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SYNOPSIS of "IMPOSSIBLE JOURNEY, A Tale of Times & Truth"
By the author

This may be the most unique science fiction novel you'll ever read! It's truly a sci-fi (specifically time-travel) novel with a purpose!
What do these historical eras have in common: 1)the California gold rush, 2)early colonial America, 3)the renaissance, 4)the reformation, 5)the time of Camelot and 6)the Roman era? They all contain valuable lessons which point to the ultimate truth.

What do a group of future scientists from all over the world have in common? A desire for truth, hope for a bright future and a belief in some sort of Divine being but nothing beyond that.
Put all of the above elements together and you have an explosive formula for a great sci-fi (science fiction) novel, a fantasy adventure novel which could also be of interest to fans of historical fiction and Christian fiction as well as those of science fiction.

In the future, when time-travel is theoretically proven an universally accepted, a group of scientists of all faiths decide to try to time-travel back to the Garden of Eden in order to prevent the fall of man and thus put an end to all sin, sickness and disease. They manage to gain the backing for the project from a wealthy financier. The trouble is, they can only go back 200 years, more or less, at a time and will have to make repairs to the time cylinder at every stop. Thus, they visit the historical California gold rush and then early Colonial America. Then, they are pulled forward unexpectedly to a future time of trouble, where robots serve, and forced to fight in a senseless war. They manage to break free and take off only to discover they have a stow away. But the stow away has a device which will help them to go further back with each leap. Thus, they then time-travel to the Renaissance and meet the historical figure, Leonardo Da Vince, But, by mistake they take off without the stow away and his device. Then, they are pulled forward again, but only to the time of the Reformation, where they meet Martin Luther and have an argument over faith. Then, with the help of a new fuel formula, using alcohol, they manage to arrive at Camelot and finally, Ancient Jerusalem, where they at last realize the real answer--the true end and goal of their mission.
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NOTE: This novel can be PURCHASED DIRECTLY from the original publisher HERE for softcover and HERE for Hardcover.
IT IS ALSO an e-book on Smashwords, so you can get A 2nd edition VERSION FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH YOUR E-READING DEVICE Or for online reading from SMASHWORDS HERE and you can READ THE FIRST 20% FOR FREE before deciding to buy at half off with coupon code AP67B at SMASHWORDS
FOR KINDLE, OR to get the print version FROM AMAZON, click HERE: Impossible Journey: A Tale of Times and Truth
SYNOPSIS OF "OF SUCH IS THE KINGDOM" BY THE AUTHOR:
Step back into New Testament times--to Ancient Jerusalem at the time of Christ and of the historical Roman Empire, and ask: What could a cynical, non-conformist dry-goods salesman, a disgruntled blacksmith, and a musing mendicant all have in common? The answer: Down deep, they all seek something better. But will they find the true fulfillment they are seeking? The non-conformist, Manaheem, Herod’s foster brother, helps Herod foment an insurrection against Pontius Pilate, using the blacksmith, Barabbas, as insurrection leader, to the dismay of Barabbas' Godly but fearful wife. The mendicant, a young man named Timotheus, joins with an older mendicant completely unsympathetic to his musings. Meanwhile, Pontius Pilate’s wife pushes him to take over Herod’s kingdom. When the insurrection fails,Barabbas turns to robbery, enlisting the aid of our two mendicants and Manaheem, tries to blackmail Herod, losing in the process his one true love, his former wife Claressa, with whom is trying to re-unite.
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NOTE: This novel has just been re-published by the original publisher in 2 new volumes, (1)a newly REVISED AND EXPANDED 2-PART 2nd edition, called, "Of Such Is The Kingdom, Parts I&II, A Novel of the Christ and the Early Church, available HERE , and (2), the sequel, "Of Such Is The Kingdom, Part III, Power and Persecution, A Novel of the Early Church and the Roman Empire," available HERE. ("Part III," deals with early church and the reaction of the rulers to this new sect called Christians.)
NOTE: TO SEE WHY YOU SHOULD ESPECIALLY GIVE the 2-Part volume of MY BIBLICAL NOVEL THIS CHRISTMAS, GO HERE. OR, get it from AMAZON HERE. You can still get the complete 3 part version from Amazon (while they last) HERE: Of Such Is the Kingdom : A Novel of Biblical Times
You can also GET THE 2nd EDITION E-VERSIONS FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH YOUR E-READING DEVICE OR FOR ONLINE READING from SMASHWORDS.com. THE COMPLETE 3 PART VERSION IS HERE, with links at the bottom of the page to the other versions (click on the book cover). You can READ THE FIRST 27% FOR FREE before deciding to buy it. And get 25% off a future purchase (for a gift) when you purchased my self-help book "Principles of the Kingdom," for only $2.99
(FOR KINDLE, click the AMAZON link above.) OR subscribe to LISTEN FREE of charge to episodes of the first edition (un-expanded PARTS I & II ONLY) HERE

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

REVIEW OF "Of Such Is The Kingdom: A Novel of Biblical Times"
Review by Viviane Crystal of Crystalreviews.com

Beneath every human beings virtues and foibles, a singular hunger lies waiting for a revelation which will create a powerful direction that supercedes all other human goals. James M. Becher takes the reader back to the lifetime of Jesus Christ, into the homes, conversations, and deeds of ordinary and extraordinary individuals who were so deeply affected by the birth of this man.

Meet Manaheem, Herod's foster brother, who on one hand attempts to influence history by helping his brother to unseat Pontius Pilate, the Roman Procurator, and on the other hand who knows there is something more to life than the grasping machinations he plans and which his brother carries out.

Observe Pilate, the ruler who holds a most undesirable position of authority in a world so unlike the Rome he loves and whose spiritual wife attempts to influence her husband from committing acts sure to doom his political career and damn his all too human soul.

Watch Timotheus, a beggar, who is deeply affected by Jesus' appearances but whose openness is constantly redirected by his companion, Lucas's, desire for more money.

Finally, meet Barabbas, a simple blacksmith who is engaged to carry out a coup against Pilate and who turns to robbery after the political plot fails. On the one hand he is portrayed as any ordinary crook but on the other hand has the same innate needs that will promise less futile struggling and more peacefulness and security. The man whose death sentence replaces that of Barabbas continues to haunt him so much that he follows the condemned prisoner's path and demise to its very last moment.

Earthly plots fail and the horrendous dying process Jesus experiences, accompanied by a desperate plea to God, compassionate words, and a moving surrender to his mission, affects everyone involved in this momentous event.

Read this book to discover the fictional yet all too probable, and powerful, effect of one man sent to speak to the heart of every human being within this novel and those who read it.

Very nicely written, J. M. Becher!
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NOTE: This novel has just been re-published by the original publisher in 2 new volumes, (1)a newly REVISED AND EXPANDED 2-PART 2nd edition, called, "Of Such Is The Kingdom, Parts I&II, A Novel of the Christ and the Early Church, available HERE , and (2), the sequel, "Of Such Is The Kingdom, Part III, Power and Persecution, A Novel of the Early Church and the Roman Empire," available HERE. ("Part III," deals with early church and the reaction of the rulers to this new sect called Christians.)
NOTE: TO SEE WHY YOU SHOULD ESPECIALLY GIVE the 2-Part volume of MY BIBLICAL NOVEL THIS CHRISTMAS, GO HERE. OR, get it from AMAZON HERE. You can still get the complete 3 part version from Amazon (while they last) HERE: Of Such Is the Kingdom : A Novel of Biblical Times
You can also GET THE 2nd EDITION E-VERSIONS FULLY COMPATIBLE WITH YOUR E-READING DEVICE OR FOR ONLINE READING from SMASHWORDS.com. THE COMPLETE 3 PART VERSION IS HERE, with links at the bottom of the page to the other versions (click on the book cover). You can READ THE FIRST 27% FOR FREE before deciding to buy it. And get 25% off a future purchase (for a gift) when you purchased my self-help book "Principles of the Kingdom," for only $2.99
(FOR KINDLE, click the AMAZON link above.) OR subscribe to LISTEN FREE of charge to episodes of the first edition (un-expanded PARTS I & II ONLY) HERE (FOR MORE ON WHY MY NOVELS ARE UNIUQE, CLICK HERE)
Hyper Smash